Institute for Positive Psychology & Education

IPPE awarded two new ARC Linkage grants

IPPE has been successful in being awarded $719,000 for two very important research projects in the latest ARC Linkage round, announced on Friday 6 May, 2016. They are as follows:


School Principals’ Diminishing Well-Being: What Makes A Positive Difference — $455,000

Researchers

Professor Herbert Marsh, Associate Professor Philip Rile, Professor Richard M Ryan, Dr Theresa Dicke, Professor Robert J Vallerand, Dr Philip Parker, and Dr Paul W Atkins

Partners

Australian Primary Principals Association Incorporated, New South Wales Secondary Principal’s Council Incorporated, Teachers Health Fund, Catholic Church Insurance Limited, AHISA Limited

Project Details

This project aims to investigate the effect of State Education Departments’ policy interventions designed to improve school principals’ flagging well-being. Increasing competition, accountability, and public scrutiny make principals stressed, and since their influence on students is second only to teachers, this threatens Australia’s socioeconomic outcomes. The project will map policy interventions to changes in principals’ motivation and well-being, and share information about the most productive and cost-effective interventions with key stakeholders across Australia. This research could reverse the declining well-being of Australia’s school leaders.


An RCT of an Education Re-Engagement Program for At-Risk Youth — $264,000

Researchers

Professor Joseph Ciarrochi, Dr Philip Parker, Professor Rhonda Craven, Professor Richard M Ryan, Associate Professor David Evans, Dr Cathy Little, Dr Baljinder Sahdra, Dr Fabri Blacklock, Dr Sarah McDonagh

Partners

The Trustee for the Bill Crews Charitable Trust

Project Details

This project aims to determine the best and most cost-effective way to help 12–15 year olds re-engage with school when they become at-risk for dropping out, by conducting a gold-standard randomised-control trial. 20% of Australians fail to attain a Year 12 or equivalent certificate, often for preventable reasons. Dropouts are more likely to be unemployed, have psychological, social, and health problems, and end up in prison. This project could influence implementation of programs and policy related to youth dropout, promote youth economic, social, and physical well-being, and decrease their chances of committing crimes and becoming a social burden.

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